Style and Trends

September 25, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

I would like to discuss style and trends for a moment. If you look on Instagram or Pinterest, you can easily pick up on the trends of today. In fact, most stock photography websites outline every year what will be trending and what they are looking for in stock photos. I don't follow trends. This is mostly due to the fact that trends change by the minute. I remember being a young boy back in the 80's that wanted nothing more than a “Members Only” jacket. By the time I got one, they were out of style and I was picked on for wearing it.


In photography, I follow my own style. Every once in a while, I like trend and use it to my advantage. But for my work that I hope to continue selling for any length of time, I stick to my own style. One example of this is the magenta trend in landscape photos this year. Everyone is adding more magenta to skies in post production. I do love magenta, but I am not going to get caught up in the silliness.

I always warn wedding clients that what is cool today may be held with great disdain in ten years. The last thing I want is a client to hate their wedding pictures in a decade. I want them to love them for the rest of their lives. The same goes with stock photography or art prints. I don't want a client that paid for a print to hate it in six months. If the content is worthy, there is no need to embellish it.

On another note dealing with style in photography, newcomers can get caught up in the hype of doing things just like the professionals on youtube. You can lose yourself in the jargon. For example, there is a youtube channel that I won't mention, but they always go on and on about making sure you have a white point and black point when editing photos. They also talk extensively about the histogram. Understanding the dynamics and rules of photography are paramount, but it is also important to break those rules once you know them.


There are times when I want a certain look and could care less about the histogram. They soul behind the eye rules eye. The most famous photographers in the world didn't become famous by acting like robots and imitating someone else. They brought their own creative soul into the mix.

Below I have an example of what I am referring to. The first photograph is straight out of the camera with no modifications. The second photograph has the distinctive black and white points and a perfect curve on the histogram. The third photograph is my artistic representation of what I felt and what I saw when at Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland. What are your thoughts?

Giants Causeway - b&wGiants Causeway - b&w Giants Causeway - "Pro" versionGiants Causeway - "Pro" version Giants Causeway - Straight out of the CameraGiants Causeway - Straight out of the Camera

 


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